Monday, March 20, 2017

An annual note to all the (NSF) haters

This piece was originally posted on my personal blog, and was written in response to the annual conversations I have with students of color facing a remarkably common variety of microaggression following major accomplishments like winning awards or earning fellowships. 

It's that time of year again: students have recently been notified about whether they received the prestigious NSF Graduate Student Research Fellowship. Known in the STEM community as "The NSF," the fellowship provides a student with three years of graduate school tuition and stipend, with the latter typically 5-10% above the standard institutional support for first- and second-year students. It's a sweet deal, and a real accellerant for young students to get their research career humming along smoothly because they don't need to restrict themselves to only advisors who have funding: the students fund themselves!

This is also the time of year that many a white dude executes what I call the "academic soccer flop." It looks kinda like this:



It typically sounds like this: "Congrats! Of course it's easier for you to win the NSF because you're, you know, the right demographic." Or worse: "She only won because she's Hispanic." 

Friday, March 17, 2017

2017 NSF GRFP Awardees and Honorable Mentions

All of us at Astronomy in Color wish to extend our congratulations to the winners of this year's NSF Graduate Research Fellowships. We are so very proud of you!

Awardees:
Munazza Alam (CUNY Hunter College --> Harvard University)
Dany Atallah (California State University, Long Beach)
Felipe Ardila (University of Florida --> Princeton University)
Aida Behmard (Yale Behmard)
Theron Carmichael (University of California, Santa Cruz --> Harvard University)
Ataxia Cruz (University of Colorado at Boulder --> University of Washington)
Ivanna Escala (University of California, San Diego --> California Institute of Technology)
Erin Flowers (Columbia University)
Juliana García Mejía (Harvard University)
Ignacio Magaña Hernández (University of California, Santa Barbara)
Amber Medina (New Mexico State University --> Harvard University)
Brittany Miles (University of California, Los Angeles --> University of California, Santa Cruz)
Malena Rice (University of California, Berkeley)
Guadalupe Tovar (University of Washington)
Samantha Walker (Fordham University --> University of Colorado at Boulder)

Honorable Mentions:
Dillon Dong (Pomona College --> California Institute of Technology)
Delilah Gates (University of Maryland --> Harvard University)
Jennifer Kadowaki (University of California, Los Angeles --> University of Arizona)
Dhaneshvaran Krishnarao (American University --> University of Wisconsin-Madison)
Goni Halevi (University of California, Berkeley)
Noah Rivera (California State University, San Bernardino)

Additions/corrections are very welcome. Thank you!


Contact: Prof. Jorge Moreno, CSMA Chair (csmachairmoreno AT gmail.com)

Tuesday, March 14, 2017

Summary of the Town Hall on Racism in Astronomy

Summary of the AAS 226th Town Hall on Racism in Astronomy
Photograph taken by Dr. Nicole Cabrera Salazar
On behalf of the CSMA and its members, Chair Moreno takes full responsibility of the outcomes of this event and the contents of this post. The current political climate, and the adverse effects on his family and his community, influenced his inability to write on this important issue in a timely manner. He conveys his sincere apologies for the delay of this post. 

Downloadable PDF slides from the Town Hall on Racism, as well as the accompanying poster “I wish my white colleagues knew...”, and photographs of the event can be found here:


Authors: Prof. Jorge Moreno and Dr. Nicole Cabrera Salazar

The Town Hall on Racism in Astronomy was organized and sponsored by the Committee on the Status of Minorities in Astronomy (CSMA). This event took place on January 4th, 2017, at the 229th AAS Meeting  in Grapevine, Texas; it lasted an hour and had between 1500 and 2000 astronomers in attendance.

The central goal of this event was to spark conversations on the problem of racism in astronomy. We recognize that, by construction, this event could not address this important issue with the depth it deserves. Having only one hour to discuss this topic was challenging, especially with such a large audience and wide range of cognizance on the subject. Nevertheless, we believe that this was an important step in our efforts to confront racism in astronomy.

The panel was composed solely of CSMA members: Dr. Nicole Cabrera Salazar, Prof. Adam Burgasser, and Prof. Jorge Moreno (CSMA Chair). Prof. John Asher Johnson was scheduled to appear as well, but was unable to attend the AAS meeting this year. We acknowledge Prof. Johnson and the rest of the CSMA for their help in developing the discussions for the Town Hall, as well as all the volunteers who helped facilitate this event.

We acknowledge that this event was held on occupied Indigenous land. We also take this opportunity to acknowledge civil rights activists throughout history, as well as activists in astronomy, who have challenged and continue to challenge colonialism, racism, and other axes of oppression in our community. This event would not have taken place without your labor. Thank you!

The Town Hall on Racism: Axiom, Goals, Structure and Resources

The entire event hinged on the following Town Hall Axiom:

We operate under the assumption that all people are created equal. If given the same choices and opportunities, all people will make choices that lead to beneficial life outcomes. Thus, any disparate and insidious outcome (e.g. astro demographics) is not natural/intrinsic, but created/extrinsic.

Goals:
To provide a safe space for people of color where their experience is recognized and validated.
To provide a moderated space for conversations in order to confront racism in our field.
To introduce basic anti-racism concepts and address common misconceptions.
To confront members of the dominant group with the problem of racism as a white problem.
To invite the community to continue the work of dismantling racism in astronomy.

Structure:
Introductions.
Acknowledgement that this event took place on stolen Indigenous land.
Town Hall Axiom on equal rights.
Safe space centered on people of color (POC): POC may recuse themselves, white people are required to stay.
Statistics on the overrepresentation of white folks in astronomy.
Statistics on mass incarceration and its effect on people of color, especially Black people and their communities.
Introduction of three words: Race, Power and Racism.
Inclusive Astronomy Ground Rules.
Instructions for volunteers to monitor conversations and intervene if necessary.
Small group discussions on three words: Race, Power and Racism.
Audience discussion and Q&A moderated by panelists.
Non-exhaustive list of resources by social scientists and activists of color.
Final Remarks.

Was our goal accomplished?
We believe so. Facilitators and members of the audience reported that conversations proceeded openly and respectfully. POC felt acknowledged, supported, heard, and safe. Senior POC expressed enthusiasm for this long overdue event. Incidents involving white audience members taking too much air were mitigated by intervention from the panelists. Undergraduate students of color, many of whom have participated in activism in their campuses, felt energized. Chair Moreno also reported conversations with senior people in the field, many of whom are excited to “do more” to confront racism at their institutions. Overall, we deemed this to be an important step towards fighting racism in astronomy.

Nevertheless, we recognize that this event was far from perfect. Based on conversations with the community, in the future we seek to improve by attempting the following:

1 Request more time. This can be accomplished with a combination of a plenary and half-day workshops.
2 Provide opportunities for more high-level POC-centered (less 101/white-centered) discussions.
3 Invite non-CSMA paid experts to lead plenary-style discussions.
4 Provide broader recognition of activists in STEM - especially in astronomy - not just social scientists.

We acknowledge the valuable contributions of fellow astronomers and physicists of color in speaking and writing about racism in these fields, as well as the time and energy they spend mentoring, advocating for, and fighting for students of color in these disciplines. We encourage community members - especially white folks - to seek out, recognize, and reward their vital but often under-appreciated work; and more importantly, to do your share of that work. Our list of resources and ideas below highlights the work of some of these people, as well as the work by a few "white accomplices". Additions to this list are very welcome.

Resources and Ideas:

Facebook Groups for Astronomers:
Astronomy Allies
AWM: Astronomer Woman Mom
Black Women+ in Physics & Astronomy
Equity & Inclusion in Physics & Astronomy
Latinx Scholars
LGBTIQ Physicists, Astrophysicists & Astronomers and Allies
Old Girls Network in Theoretical and Computational Astrophysics

Disclaimer: The above lists are not to be construed as endorsement by the authors.

We invite the community to send us your ideas, criticisms, and resources so we can improve in the future.


Contact
Prof. Jorge Moreno, CSMA Chair (csmachairmoreno AT gmail.com)

Monday, January 30, 2017

Statement on the “Muslim Ban”

Dear fellow astronomers,

Three days ago, the POTUS signed an executive order to initiate a 90-day immigration suspension for all people born in the following Middle Eastern and North African (MENA) countries: Iran, Iraq, Syria, Sudan, Yemen, Libya and Somalia. These countries are majority Muslim, making this ban unconstitutional on the grounds of religious freedom. The impact of this order is further exacerbated by the public call to prioritize cases involving Christians, which sends the signal that this is faith-based discrimination.

The “Muslim Ban” has already caused immigrants, even those with permanent residency in the U.S., to be detained at airports all around the country without due process, without food or water in some cases, and without rightful access to their lawyers. On Saturday, a petition from the American Civil Liberties Union led U.S. District Judge Ann Donnelly to successfully block a portion of the executive order, forbidding the U.S. government from deporting any “lawful” immigrants arriving after the ban was issued. However, immigrants from those countries are still prohibited from entering the U.S.

These discriminatory acts are detrimental to our Muslim colleagues in a variety of ways. Public stigma may prevent those already in the U.S. from traveling safely within the country while the ban forbids them from traveling abroad, potentially missing interviews, conferences, observing runs, and of course preventing them from being united with family members outside the U.S. Likewise, colleagues from these seven aforementioned countries will be restricted from exercising professional and personal activities on U.S. soil. Above all, the mental, physical, and emotional toll that will be experienced by our Muslim colleagues is damaging their safety, work and livelihood.

As members of the Committee on the Status of Minorities in Astronomy (CSMA), we vehemently oppose this ban, a discriminatory act by the U.S. government against our Muslim students, colleagues and friends. We stand with all Muslim people and extend our solidarity to our Muslim colleagues in Astronomy. We will do whatever we can to support and protect you.

Signatories
Dr. Nicole Cabrera Salazar
Prof. Jorge Moreno
Dr. Lia Corrales
Charee Peters
Prof. Jillian Bellovary
Prof. John Asher Johnson
Prof. Kim Coble
Prof. Adam Burgasser
Prof. Alyson Brooks

The above signatories are private citizens exercising their constitutional right to express their personal views. This is not an official statement by the CSMA nor the AAS and should not be construed as such.

Links and resources
Contact
Prof. Jorge Moreno, CSMA Chair (csmachairmoreno AT gmail.com)


Friday, December 30, 2016

Astronomers of Color Presenting at the 229th AAS

Here is a (non-exhaustive) list of astronomers of color who will be presenting at the 229th AAS meeting, in Grapevine, Texas. Many of the undergrads were students in the Harvard Aztlán and Banneker InstitutesTAURUSNACLamatCAMPAREMaria Mitchell and various REU and bridge programs. Folks applying to REUs, graduate programs or postdocs are marked with a “*". Please be sure to stop by these scientists' posters and talks and hear about their exceptional research. If you plan on recruiting them to your institution, know that competition will be fierce!

Rationale
We, the members of the AAS Committee for the Status of Minorities in Astronomy, place an emphasis on the self-evident truth that all people are created equal. This is to say that any two groups of people, no matter how they are classified, if given the same choices and opportunities in life, will act in such a way as to better their lives. Based on this truth, if two groups of people are observed to experience disparate outcomes in society, this must be the result of extrinsic, rather than intrinsic factors. In astronomy, white people (primarily cisgender, able-bodied, heterosexual men) are overrepresented in the field with respect to people of color. Since we believe that all people are created equal in their potential and desire to better their understanding of the Universe, this outcome must be the result of factors extrinsic to and individual's or group's race (as well as their sexuality, gender, gender expression or mental/cognitive/physical ability). These extrinsic factors fall under the rubric of systemic racism (and other axes of oppression), and our efforts to promote people of color is part of our greater effort to counteract the effects of racism in our society. Thus, we are not attempting to help people because of their race, but rather we are helping to push back against the racism that would otherwise maintain the status quo and impede intellectual progress in our field of science. 
—Wednesday—

106.05. DEdicated MONitor of EXotransits and Transients (DEMONEXT): Low-Cost Robotic and Automated Telescope for Followup of Exoplanetary Transits and Transients
10:50 AM - 11:00 AM; Grapevine B (Oral Presentation)
Graduate Student, The Ohio State University

113.01. Limits on Intergalactic Dust during Reionization
10:00 AM - 11:30 AM; Grapevine 1 
Postdoctoral Fellow, Harvard University (Harvard Future Faculty Leaders Fellowship)

114.05. Measuring the extent of x-ray emitting hot gas haloes around elliptical galaxies
10:00 AM - 11:30 AM; Grapevine 2
Postdoctoral Fellow, NASA Ames Research Center

117.01. The Tumultuous Lives and Deaths of Stars
11:40 AM - 12:30 PM; Texas A (Oral Presentation - Plenary Talk)
Assistant Professor, The Ohio State University

122.05. DeepLensing: The Use of Deep Machine Learning to Find Strong Gravitational Lenses in Astronomical Surveys
2:00 PM - 3:30 PM; Texas D
Postdoctoral Fellow, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

127.06. Single Star HII Regions in nearby LEGUS Galaxies
2:00 PM - 3:30 PM; Texas 1 (Oral Presentation)
Undergraduate Student, Hamilton College (NAC)

131.01D. Calibrating the Age-Rotation-Activity Relation in Low-Mass Stars: Chromospheric and Coronal Activity in the 500 Myr-old M37 Open Cluster
2:00 PM - 3:30 PM; Grapevine 1 (Oral Presentation)
Graduate Student, Columbia University

132.02. GBT CO observations of two ACT dusty star-forming galaxies
2:00 PM - 3:30 PM; Grapevine 2 (Oral Presentation)
Graduate Student, Rutgers University

137.04 The Arecibo Environment Galaxy Survey: The NGC 2577/UGC 4375-galaxy pair
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Undergraduate Student, Wellesley College

139.03. Experimentally Determined Binding Energies of Astrophysically Relevant Hydrocarbons in Pure and H2O-Layered Ices
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Undergraduate Student, Princeton University

140.02. Update on the Citizen CATE Experiment: Indonesia to 2017
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Undergraduate Student, South Caroline State University (NAC)

*Dany V. Atallah
141.03. Gravitational Wave Detection of Compact Binaries Through Multivariate Analysis
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Undergraduate Student CSU Long Beach (U Florida IREU / Cal-Bridge)

*Jacqueline Antwi-Danso
145.07. Feeding the Milky Way: Properties of the Leading Arm of the Magellanic Stream
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Undergraduate Student, Texas Christian University

145.18. Gas Stripping in the Simulated Pegasus Galaxy
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Undergraduate Student, Cal Poly Pomona (Aztlán Institute / UCI SURF / Cal-Bridge)

146.17. Searching for Wide, Planetary-Mass Companions in Archival Spitzer/IRAC Data
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Graduate Student, The University of Texas at Austin

Samavarti Gallardo
145.26. Comparison between high and low star forming sides of dwarf irregular galaxies with asymmetrical distributions of star formation.
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Undergraduate Student, Cal State LA (NAU REU / CAMPARE)

146.29. Techniques for Constraining the Population of Small Close-in Planets Around Subgiants
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Graduate Student, Harvard University

146.33. How many habitable planets can we detect around nearby M dwarfs, and are they really habitable?
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Undergraduate Student, North Carolina A&T State University (Harvard Banneker Institute)

147.03. Recovering Neptune 170 Years After its Initial Discovery
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Undergraduate Student, Yale University (2015 Harvard Banneker Institute)

148.02. Calculating the Flux Density Decay of Cas A with LWA1
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Undergraduate Student,  CUNY Hunter College (NAC)

148.07. Measuring the Symmetry of Supernova Remnants in the Radio
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Undergraduate Student, The Ohio State University

148.08. Behind the Curtain: Revealing the Nebular Influence on X-ray Emission from Planetary Nebulae
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Research Scientist, Harvard University

*Teresa Panurach
150.05. Understanding the IGM Through the Use of a Lensed Quasar
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Undergraduate Student, CUNY Hunter College

Manisha Shrestha
151.11. Polarization signatures of bow shocks: A diagnostic tool to constrain the properties of stellar winds and ISM
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Graduate Student, University of Denver

152.10. Evidence for Binarity in Kepler Observations of the Pulsating RV Tau Variable DF Cygni
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Graduate Student, Fisk-Vanderbilt

Alyssa D. Sokol
153.08. An LMT/AzTEC 1.1 mm Survey of Dense Cores in the Monoceros R2 Giant Molecular Cloud
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Graduate Student, University of Massachusetts Amherst

153.09. High Resolution 33 GHz Observations of Embedded Star Formation in NGC 6240
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Graduate Student, Fisk-Vanderbilt (NAC)

*Alia Wofford
153.16. How Does Dense Molecular Gas Contribute to Star Formation in the Starburst Galaxy NGC 2146?
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Undergraduate Student, Elizabeth City State University (NAC)

154.13. Modeling the spatial distribution of fragments formed from tidally disrupted stars
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Undergraduate Student, Harvard University (Harvard Banneker Institute)

154.14. Understanding Activity Cycles of Solar Type Stars with Kepler
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Undergraduate Student, University of Washington (Harvard Banneker Institute)

154.20. Investigating the Common Origins of Stars Using Dynamical Modeling
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Undergraduate Student, Villanova University (TAURUS)

155.19. Design Considerations for the Installation of an Iodine (I2) Cell onto TRES
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Undergraduate Student, Harvard University (Harvard Banneker Institute)

155.21. Camera Development for the Cherenkov Telescope Array
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Undergraduate Student, CUNY Hunter College

—Thursday—

202.02. Formation of Hazes & Clouds on Tidally Locked Hot-Jupiters: Insights from Size Distribution Dynamics
10:00 AM - 11:30 AM; Texas A (Oral Presentation)
Graduate Student, UC Santa Cruz

216.02. On the Radial Abundance Gradients of Europium and Oxygen of Stars Inside the Disk of a Simulated Milky Way
2:00 PM - 3:30 PM; Grapevine B (Oral Presentation)
Undergraduate Student, UC Santa Cruz (Lamat)

*Md. Tanveer Karim
216.08. Probing the Southern Fermi Bubble in Ultraviolet Absorption
10:00 AM - 11:30 AM; Dallas 6 (Oral Presentation)
Undergraduate Student, University of Rochester (Maria Mitchell REU)

Sinclaire Manning
222.06. Photometric Redshifts for High Resolution Radio Galaxies in the SuperCLASS Field
2:00 PM - 3:30 PM; Grapevine A (Oral Presentation)
Graduate Student, The University of Texas at Austin

223.06. A Numerical Study on the Streams of Star Debris after Tidal Disruption
2:00 PM - 3:30 PM; Grapevine B (Oral Presentation)
Undergraduate Student, UC Santa Cruz (Lamat)

230.04D. Elucidating the True Binary Fraction of VLM Stars and Brown Dwarfs with Spectral Binaries
2:00 PM - 3:30 PM; Grapevine 1 (Oral Presentation - Dissertation Talk)
Graduate Student, UC San Diego

*Manuel Paul
238.35. An Exploration of Software-Based GNSS Signal Processing at Multiple Frequencies
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Undergraduate Student, CSU San Bernardino (MIT Haystack REU / Cal-Bridge)

240.08. Too Cool for Stellar Rules: A Bayesian Exploration of Trends in Ultracool Magnetism
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Associate Professor, CUNY Hunter College and AMNH

*Russell Van Linge
240.12. Tuning Into Brown Dwarfs: Long-Term Radio Monitoring of Two Very Low Mass Dwarfs
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Undergraduate Student, Palomar College (UCSD STARS / CAMPARE)

240.14. Characterization of Low-mass K2 planet hosts using Near-Infrared Spectroscopy
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Graduate Student, University of Puerto Rico (Harvard Banneker Institute)

Jean Paul Ventura
240.16. Investigating the Spectroscopic Variability and Magnetic Activity of Photometrically Variable M Dwarfs in SDSS
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Undergraduate Student, CUNY Hunter College

240.17. Toward a Comprehensive Sample of VLM Chemical Abundances with APOGEE
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Graduate Student, Morehouse College

240.18. Modeling Stellar Parameters for High Resolution Late-M and Early-L Dwarf SDSS/APOGEE Spectra
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Undergraduate Student, UC San Diego 

240.19. Characterizing the Resolved M6 Dwarf Twin LP 318-218AB
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Undergraduate Student, Universidad de Guanajuato (México)

*Sanaea C. Rose
243.08. Long-term Accretion Variations of the Magnetic Cataclysmic Variable Star QQ Vulpecula
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Undergraduate Student, Wellesley College (Maria Mitchell REU)

John A. Lewis
244.03. Transit probabilities for debris around white dwarfs
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Graduate Student, Harvard University

245.07. Using Transmission Spectroscopy to Determine the Rotation Rate of HD 189733b
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Undergraduate Student, Columbia University

245.08. Determining Vsin(i) of Young Planet-hosting Stars
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Undergraduate Student, Florida International University (TAURUS)

*Noah I. Rivera
245.16. Exoplanet Transit Analysis of KIC 8462852
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Undergraduate Student, CSU San Bernardino (Northwestern CIERA REU / Cal-Bridge)

245.17. A Search for Host Stars of Free-Floating Planetary Mass Objects
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Undergraduate Student, Rice University (TAURUS)

*Luis E. Nuñez
245.21. Small Friends of Hot Jupiters
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Undergraduate Student, Cal Poly Pomona (Harvard Banneker & Aztlán Institute / SAO REU / Cal-Bridge)

Winonah Ojaneh
245.25. The effect of stellar radiation on exoplanet atmospheric heating and mass loss
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Undergraduate Student, College of St. Scholastica

246.02. Using Quasar Pairs to put Constraints on Cosmological Parameters
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Recent Graduate, University of the Pacific (Harvard Banneker Institute)

246.05. Galaxy Interaction in Overdense Environments
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Undergraduate Student, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga (TAURUS)

247.02. Optical Observations and Modeling of a Possible Black Hole HMXB and Cygnus X-1 Progenitor
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Graduate Student, Harvard University

Evan H. Nunez
250.07. New quasar surveys with WIRO: Searching for high redshift (z~6) quasar candidates
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Undergraduate Student, El Camino College (U Wyoming REU / CAMPARE)

250.23. Statistical Analysis of Quasar Light Curves from Pan-STARRS1
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Undergraduate Student, CUNY Hunter College

—Friday—

310.01. Using Disk Eclipsing Systems to Understand Planet Formation and Evolution
10:00 AM - 11:30 AM; Texas 4 (Oral Presentation)
Postdoctoral Fellow, Harvard University

314.01. The AstroPAL Starter Pack: How to Create a Grad Mentoring Program That Fosters Equity and Inclusion in Your Department
10:00 AM - 11:30 AM; Dallas 6 (Oral Presentation)
Recent PhD, Georgia State University

320.01. Upgrades to MINERVA control software
2:00 PM - 3:30 PM; Texas D (Oral Presentation)
Graduate Student, Harvard University (2015 Harvard Banneker Institute)

321.01. Quantifying the Effects of Gas-Rich Flyby Encounters on Galaxy Evolution
2:00 PM - 3:30 PM; Grapevine A (Oral Presentation)
Postdoctoral Fellow, Vanderbilt University

327.05D. Searching for the Youngest Protostellar Disks and Earliest Signs of Planet Formation
2:00 PM - 3:30 PM; Grapevine 1 (Oral Presentation - Dissertation Talk)
Graduate Student, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign

339.03. Non-Equilibrium Ionization Modeling of Coronal Mass Ejections
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Undergraduate Student, CSU San Marcos (Harvard Banneker Institute / Harvard Solar REU)

Uriel Rodea
340.15. Properties of Low Metallicity Molecular Clouds: A 0.3 Parsec Resolution Map of SMC B1 #1
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Undergraduate Student, CSU San Marcos (UCSD STARS / CAMPARE)

340.17. Discovering the Lowest Metallicty z<1 Galaxies
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Undergraduate Student, UC Santa Cruz (Lamat)

Matthew Melendez
343.03. The Open Cluster Chemical Abundances and Mapping (OCCAM) Survey: Optical Extension for Neutron Capture Elements
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Graduate Student, Texas Christian University

*Derrick Carr
343.14. Deep WIYN Imaging of the Globular Cluster System of the Lenticular Galaxy NGC 3607
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Undergraduate Student, Haverford College (Maria Mitchell REU)

344.24. Determination of the Fundamental Properties of the Eclipsing Binary V541 Cygni
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Undergraduate Student, University of Tennessee, Knoxville

345.03. An ALMA Survey of Planet Forming Disks in Rho Ophiuchu
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Graduate Student, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign

345.19. Chemistry of protostellar envelopes and disks: computational testing of 2D abundances
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Graduate Student, CSU Los Angeles

346.13. Evolution of the BCG in Disturbed Galaxy Clusters
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Undergraduate Student, Princeton University

347.06. Investigating the Initial Mass Function with Increased Redshift
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Undergraduate Student, Columbia University (TAURUS)

*Tarini Konchady
347.14. Investigating the Metallicity Evolution of Sub-damped Lyman alpha Systems
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Undergraduate Student, Johns Hopkins University (Maria Mitchell REU)

347.17. Quantitative Morphology Measures in Galaxies: Ground-Truthing from Simulations
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Assistant Professor, University of Florida

347.36. Kinematics of Galaxy Mergers in The FIRE Simulation
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Undergraduate Student, Cal Poly Pomona (Harvard Aztlán Institute / CAMPARE / Cal-Bridge)

347.37. Galaxy merger time-scales in the Illustris Simulation
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Undergraduate Student, Cal Poly Pomona (Harvard Aztlán Institute / CAMPARE)

Muhammad Wally
347.56. A Study of E+A Galaxies Through SDSS-MaNGA Integral Field Spectroscopy
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Undergraduate Student, Xavier University of Louisiana

*Tharindu K. Jayasinghe
340.08. The Milky Way Project: Mapping star formation in our home Galaxy, one click at a time
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Undergraduate Student, Cal Poly Pomona (CAMPARE)

*Don Dixon
340.09. The Milky Way Project: A Citizen Science Catalog of Infrared Bow Shock Nebulae
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Undergraduate Student, Cal Poly Pomona (CAMPARE / Cal-Bridge)

Matthew Melendez
343.03. The Open Cluster Chemical Abundances and Mapping (OCCAM) Survey: Optical Extension for Neutron Capture Elements
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Graduate Student, Texas Christian University
343.23. Star Clusters within FIRE
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Undergraduate Student, CSU Dominguez Hills (Harvard Aztlán Institute / CAMPARE / Cal-Bridge)

345.18. Understanding Gas-Phase Ammonia Chemistry in Protoplanetary Disks
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Undergraduate Student, Yale University (Harvard Banneker Institute)

—Saturday—

403.02. Light Curves as Predictors of Good Radial Velocity Planet Search Targets in New Stellar Domains
10:00 AM - 11:30 AM; Texas D
Assistant Professor, Pennsylvania State University 

410.02. Near-infrared absolute magnitudes of Type Ia Supernovae
10:00 AM - 11:30 AM; Fort Worth 6 (Oral Presentation)
Postdoctoral Fellow,  Harvard University

Nicholas Duong
424.04. Shape Modeling and Boulder Mapping of Asteroid 1992 UY4
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Undergraduate Student University of Louisville (SETI REU)

*Stefenie N. Minto
425.11. Extra Solar Planet Science With a Non Redundant Mask
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Undergraduate Student, University of Maryland Eastern Shore (NAC)

427.08. Bar Evolution and Bar Properties from Disc Galaxies in the Early Universe
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Undergraduate Student, Spelman College

431.04. Searching for Magnetar SGR 0755-2933
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Recent Graduate, Green Bank Telescope

435.01. Revisiting the Trend of Debris Disks with regards to the Improved Ages of Early-Type Stars
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM; Longhorn D (Poster)
Undergraduate Student, Howard University


Contact: Prof. Jorge Moreno, CSMA Chair (csmachairmoreno AT gmail.com)